4 quarts of type F - Transmission Experiment

O-Gauge Steamer

New member
You can get proper filters from Summit, JEGS or any of the performance sites. I seriously doubt that BozoZone or Pep Boys will have any idea of what you are talking about.

Just prefill the filter prior to installing it. OK, you do not have to do that, it is just something I do. Does not make it right...

On the other hand, it will save the transmission from having to fill it. You are going to have to add the extra fluid anyway.
 

5-90

New member
I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around the idea that Type F fluid is gonna be harsher than Berryman's and therefore require a supplemental filter.
1) It's not the detergents that will be the problem - it's the friction modifiers. They can screw with clutches.

2) A supplemental filter isn't necessary - but it's not a bad idea, either. The typical filter element for a slushbox is a sheet of fibre material or paper - and for the AW4, it's a coarse metal strainer (about 1/16" or so screen mesh, I want to think.) I was going to add a spin-on to my automatics, I just hadn't gotten around to it (the stock slushbox filter often isn't very good.

The Type F will probably break up varnish and crud deposits, but can cause clutch chatter, hard shifting, or clutch slippage. A filter won't correct that, because it's caused by properties intrinsic to the fluid. I've used Type F as an ersatz hand cleaner (as I mentioned,) and I've often used it as an engine flush as well.
 

cruiser54

New member
So, he's got 4 quarts of Type F and 4 quarts of old fluid in the trans.

A couple of drain and fills and it seems he shuld be fine, right?
 

O-Gauge Steamer

New member
5-90, your are correct sir, an external filter is not required. But it can't hurt either. It will trap the big particles that start to come loose. And they will start to come loose.

And I agree that it is the friction modifiers that are at issue. The OP really needs to get the type F out as soon as possible.

Automatics can be sort of funny, you can actually bring one to a quick death by changing the fluid if it has never been properly maintained. all of the accumalted garbage that is holding it together washes out and you get clutch failures.

In '98, my Dad died so my Brother decided to keep the '85 Lincoln Town Car. The auto on it had never had the fuid changed so he did it. Within a month the trans was slipping and he had to have it rebuilt.

The verdict from the trans shop he used? "You changed the fluid and you should not have".

Dropping in a quart of ATF is an old school engine cleaner with a long history. You need to be carefull not to run it very long.
 

5-90

New member
5-90, your are correct sir, an external filter is not required. But it can't hurt either. It will trap the big particles that start to come loose. And they will start to come loose.

And I agree that it is the friction modifiers that are at issue. The OP really needs to get the type F out as soon as possible.

Automatics can be sort of funny, you can actually bring one to a quick death by changing the fluid if it has never been properly maintained. all of the accumalted garbage that is holding it together washes out and you get clutch failures.

In '98, my Dad died so my Brother decided to keep the '85 Lincoln Town Car. The auto on it had never had the fuid changed so he did it. Within a month the trans was slipping and he had to have it rebuilt.

The verdict from the trans shop he used? "You changed the fluid and you should not have".

Dropping in a quart of ATF is an old school engine cleaner with a long history. You need to be carefull not to run it very long.
Slushboxen are strange creatures indeed - is there any wonder that I prefer to stir my own gears?

If I'm going to tear down the engine soon and I want to preclean it, I've been known to run half-and-half engine oil and Diesel to break crud loose - but I'll only do that if I plan to strip the engine down next in the first place (since just about anything made of rubber is going to be wasted.)

ATF does work for cleaning engines as a flush - but I wouldn't run it for more than a couple hundred miles - more probably, one good hard drive and drain it hot. ATF (whatever spec) can be antagonistic to "rubber" seals in the engine...
 

O-Gauge Steamer

New member
Exactly right again. Using either ATF or Diesel in engine oil is good to break things loose in a hurry. And yet again I agree, you really do not want to run it for long. Unless you want the engine to turn into a grenade...

In the old days, we would run it for a day or two at most before the tear down as the seals turn to slime pretty quickly. Plus you loose lubrication quality. If either were a good idea to use instead of engine oil, we would be using them...

Personally, I like Manuals for the mechanical efficiency and Automatics for the ease of operation. I have ran both on the trails and decided with this Heep to go Automatic. The AW4 is a solid box of parts and is capable of taking a substantial amount of abuse.
 

Diamond-x

New member
If you pop off the trans cooler return line at the trans, put on a vinyl tube into a container and start the engine it should pump fluid. When it starts to bubble shut the engine off. Refill the trans with the amount pumped out and re-do.

In this manner you can replace 99.9% of the fluid.
 

kastein

NAXJA Member
NAXJA Member
Automatics can be sort of funny, you can actually bring one to a quick death by changing the fluid if it has never been properly maintained. all of the accumalted garbage that is holding it together washes out and you get clutch failures.

In '98, my Dad died so my Brother decided to keep the '85 Lincoln Town Car. The auto on it had never had the fuid changed so he did it. Within a month the trans was slipping and he had to have it rebuilt.

The verdict from the trans shop he used? "You changed the fluid and you should not have".
I am not sure I believe this. My opinion is that 90% of the time people blame trans failure on changing the fluid is... the transmission started shifting funny, so they said "oh shit I have never changed the fluid in this thing, I need to do that" and do so. The trans dies a short while later, they blame it on the new fluid, not the fact that they put eight times the recommended mileage on it before changing the fluid. If people did that to an engine (and I've seen it happen), their warranty claim would rightly be denied.

The stirred-up crap may hasten its demise, but generally it was on its last legs anyways, and all that crap wouldn't be there to get stirred up if they had kept up on their fluid change intervals.
 
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