Has anyone snapped a bolt off the CPS.....?

Runnin'OnEmpty

New member
I was well on the way to replacing the CPS on my 96 Sport this afternoon, but got hung up on the bottom bolt. It just would not come loose. The top one came loose fine, but the bottom bolt is stuck solid. The 1/4" socket and extensions/swivel wouldn't apply enough torque to break it loose, even with an application of PB Blaster. There's no room to get a wrench on it.

I'm worried about snapping the bolt, and getting into a real mess.....:confused1

Any suggestions?
ROE
 

5-90

New member
Can you manage to get a longish drift on it, and tap that with a hammer?

Those are non-standard shoulder screws (I've really got to measure those spares I've got around here somewhere...) so you can't find them just anywhere. The shoulder is on the screw to locate the CPS properly WRT the flywheel/flexplate.

Installation torque for those screws is down around 14 pound-feet, so you should be able to loosen them with a little tapping. I've certainly never managed to break one...

Good luck!
 

88xjchief

New member
When I replaced mine it seemed like it was going to brake but luckily it didnt. Try using a bigger ratched like 3/8.
 

scottmcneal

The 97 Club
NAXJA Member
tighting it a little first will break the dirt around the treads.. mine came right out after that
 

Runnin'OnEmpty

New member
Disaster averted and life is good again.....

Many thanks, 5-90, Chief, and Scott. I tried ALL your suggestions (tapping, 3/8", reverse torque), and it finally broke loose. The trouble was galvanic corrosion on the end of the bolt. It was built up on the threads and almost 'welded' to the aluminum bellhousing. These bolt holes are open towards the front, and apparently road salt and rain had gotten in the hole and corroded the bolt. I cleaned the threads, applied anti-seize, and installed the new CPS with no problems.

Couple of tips:
I used a dab of body seam sealer in the socket to hold the bolts while installing. (Some use grease)
Wrapping the swivel in masking tape will make it less flexible and aid in 'aiming' the bolts.
I also disconnected the front driveshaft and wired it to the exhaust pipe to get it out of the way. This gives much better access to the sensor area.

I noticed that the old (original) CPS had a much stronger magnet in it than the new aftermarket CPS. Does this mean anything?
The engine started up fine and I could tell no difference in it's running. (Reason for changing was just for preventive maintainence purposes)

Thanks again guys,
ROE
 

RyanM

New member
What brand did you get? I replaced mine and I think I noticed the same thing. I keep my OEM under the back seat just incase
 

Runnin'OnEmpty

New member
RyanM said:
What brand did you get? I replaced mine and I think I noticed the same thing. I keep my OEM under the back seat just incase
It's a Tru-Tech, made by Standard Motor Products.
It's made in the good ol' USA, at least that's what's printed on the box.

I placed a screwdriver blade over both CPS's ends, and the OEM had a much stronger magnetic pull than the Tru-Tech. I don't know if that's a good test of quality, though.....? Maybe after 11 years the design/quality of these things has been improved.....? I hope so. Can't figure out why the CPS fails so frequently, anyway.
 

1985xjlaredo

New member
Runnin'OnEmpty said:
It's a Tru-Tech, made by Standard Motor Products.
It's made in the good ol' USA, at least that's what's printed on the box.

I placed a screwdriver blade over both CPS's ends, and the OEM had a much stronger magnetic pull than the Tru-Tech. I don't know if that's a good test of quality, though.....? Maybe after 11 years the design/quality of these things has been improved.....? I hope so. Can't figure out why the CPS fails so frequently, anyway.
It fails cause of the heat that it is subject to.
 
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