How to get Stranded

ParadiseXJ

New member
So, I'd like to hear from the rest of you all to put together a list of things that, if they failed, would leave you and your Jeep stranded in the middle of nowhere. I've only been hopelessly stranded once. With a friend and my dog. I had to walk six miles to a place where I could get phone service to call another friend to come and bring me a CPS...and/or a ride. The CPS wire melted on the manifold. Then I had to walk back six miles to my truck and spend the night until he got there.

So...from sensors to hardware...what would you ALWAYS carry with you (spares or tools or hardware) to limp out of the woods.

For starters:
CPS
Fuel line
Belt
 

Green Mesa XJ

New member
My old 85 was/is the one I spent the most time with on the trails. Just started taking the 90s XJ off road more but there aren't a lot of great places around here for it.

When I lived out west just about every free day I was in the mountains or desert.

Always carried.
Water (for drinking or radiator)
Rope
Bungee cords
Duct tape (thanks MacGyver!)
Electrical tape
Some wire and cheap wire cutter & crimper from Kmart . (All kinds of interesting electrical problems before I took the old harness out. )
A small tool kit with metric and standard sockets (jeep uses both so, it's wasted space)
adjustable wrench
Two screwdrivers
Depending how far out I was going a few gallons of gas. (Fuel gauge wasn't the most accurate)
Also had a fiberglass ax handle for prying or hitting. Guess a hammer would do instead.
Fuel line after the drive shaft took out the metal lines . (Always afraid the repair would leak)

For the 4.0 I'd probably put one of the old CPS that still work under the rear seats. Amazing how much you can put there, that is where I kept belts and wrenches, tape and wire cutter. Ratchet kit was bulkier and in the back with a big jug of water .

Don't think i ever needed any of it, except for the water and that was poor canteen planning for a 12 mile hike.
Could have used a come-a-long or wrench when it got stuck in the snow. Wouldn't get stuck there again with the lift and axel it's got now .





Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

md21722

NAXJA Member
NAXJA Member
I have a few commonly used relays under the seat. You could always "borrow" a lesser "needed" relay temporarily but they aren't that expensive and don't take up much room.
 

jordan96xj

New member
I am a 80/day daily driver in my 96 XJ. I have been slowly building out my on-board kit with tools and spares. So far I have:

1. 1 Gallon antifreeze 50/50
2. 1 Quart Each Oil/TransFluid
3. Belt
4. Cargo Straps / Bungees
5. Compressor, Tire Slime
6. Jumper cables
7. Small Lithium Polymer battery jumper pack (MUST HAVE!)
8. Folding lug nut wrench
9. 1/2 and 3/8 sockets - Mostly metric with enough adapters and extensions for most jobs
10. Safety wire, Epoxy, Steel Stick, JB-Quik Weld, Duct tape.
11. Spare CPS, CTS, IAC, Spark plugs, Cap/rotor, Fuse assortment, 2 standard relays, 1 larger fan relay
12. Multimeter with DC AMP clamp (all one unit, MUST HAVE!)
13. Onboard OBD2 Scanner with spare old Android phone as a digital dash (customized to always be scanning and turn on with the vehicle)
14. 2 Cargo Blankets - for emergencies - and for covering cargo to keep it out of mind.
15. Pliers, Wrench, 2 Screwdrivers, Small Torx set

I have one small milk-crate for the liquids and larger items, one medium tool bag (harbor freight style) and I purchased one of those small shaped bags that goes into the rear panel pocket behind the passenger rear wheel well. I decided to stick with the tool bag for most of the tools so that I could help other people on the road and have more options for moving the tools around.

In addition, I full time carry 4 fishing rods (ready to go), a kayak paddle, my kayak milkcrate sized tackle bag/box. So that I can always fish, whenever, wherever.
 

Anak

Stranger
NAXJA Member
Tire plug kit and some way to re-inflate a tire (could be as simple as a can of Fix-a-flat)

Spare idler pulley

Spare key attached to the outside of the vehicle in some hidden fashion

Repair coupling and clamps sized for radiator hose
 

8Mud

New member
If you have an automatic, an extra starter. A mud puddle can gum it up. Swapping out a starter is a whole lot easier than have to disassemble it and clean it out.

I keep a junkyard set of sensors, it actually fits in a small toolbox.

Can of quick start. Can of WD 40.

I also carry a magnetic rooftop yellow strobe.

Need air, I made a spark plug air connector, 20 feet of air hose and a tire filler nozzle. Just unhook that injector. I usually use number 2, it is easy to get at.

Popping a bead back on the rim, either a ratchet strap or quick start. If you use the quick start watch your eyebrows and/or beard.:)
 

ehall

NAXJA Member
NAXJA Member
I have a ziploc baggie with one of every sensor plus ignition coil, spare spark plugs, and injectors. Another baggie for wire, quick connect terminals, tape, fuses, rtv, etc. Another bag for emergency stuff includes water filter, fire starter, bandana, poncho / blanket, knife, etc (a lot of that stuff is small and cheap). Also have a spare serpentine belt. All of it fits under the rear seat
 

ParadiseXJ

New member
All good stuff. I have a lot of this for just everyday in a tool bag and in my glovebox. Tranny & fuel connector O-rings, TPS spare, CPS spare, Dex/Merc, oil, RTV. A pretty comprehensive tool kit for it's size, metric, SAE and torx...AND a AAA Plus card in my wallet.

For trips to the wilds I have an "Action Packer" tote box 4 u-joints and a big c-clamp, 4 ft. of 3/8" fuel/tranny line. Behind seat (MJ) I have the battery pack, compressor, big bottle jack, compact down sleeping bag and a wool blanket 20+ ft of 12 and 10 ga. wire, Full set of deep sockets with a small and large breaker bar. Hose clamps large and small.

I like the emergency air hose idea, I may have to try that, Still trying to maximize what I'm including while making it more compact
 

SC Rednek

NAXJA Member
NAXJA Member
Best way to get really stranded is no VHF ham radio or CB amplifier (technically illegal in the US, but if it saves your life, ...), lockers and winch just tend to get you stuck more rarely, but when you do it's REALLY bad!

So now that I've living back in the southeast, this isn't such a big deal. But when I was living in Nevada, this was a HUGE deal, once went over 200 miles without seeing a person or even crossing a paved road, was not uncommon being 50+ miles from the nearest person or pavement. So I'm going to list my 600 lb NV gear load, not my 200 lb TN load. So if you really want to be a crazy person like me and wheel alone, then here's a good list to be able to stay safe.

--Survival gear - first, DO NOT count this food and water into the stuff you expect to consume! You need a backpack, shelter, and lightweight calorie sources that don't require heat of cooling (like can of beans), for at least 3 days. For survival without moving (such as scorpion or snake bite) 7 days worth of food and water and just hope someone finds you! And in the desert cannot count on water sources other than urine to filter (yeah, if you're desperately stuck, save it), so water water water! I've read about people dying in 7 hours from lack of water out there. normally I keep all my drinking water in the form of a 24 pack of water bottles, plus a 5 gallon Gerry can of water that is semi potable. But consider, the human body can survive 40 days without food, and 3 days (or about 1 day in the desert) without water. So for a 50 mile survival hike, just fill your pack with water. For shelter a military grade poncho (sorry, but they're like $50 if you aren't issued one) and a 12 ft rope tied between trees is a great tent
--5 gallons spare gas minimum (once I ignored this and ran out of gas 60 miles from the nearest gas station in death valley, don't repeat my mistake!). Gasoline powered camp stove if you can find one is also useful
-- first aid kit. I keep mine in one of the 3 normal size 200 rd 223 ammo cans I keep with the jeep. Keep everything from splints and tourniquets, but most of what you'll use is hangover meds, motion sickness pills for that inexperienced girl you picked up at the bar yesterday, etc...
--Electrical - My 2nd ammo can - probably the most overlooked part of a gear load since most people don't understand it all. Have at least 1 or more of every fuse in the jeep, my 99 has mini's, normal, and big ass sizes. plus a voltmeter, heck you can get a free one at harbor freight with a purchase of $4 or more, just watch the ads, you have no excuse. 10 ft or more lengths of wire in multiple gauges up to 10 ga, plus crimp tool, splices, connectors, etc.
--bolts and stuff - my 3rd ammo can is an assortment of about 20 lbs of random bolts, nuts, washers, etc. You would not believe how many times this has saved mine and other peoples asses!
--Toolbox - pretty self explanatory, just make sure you have the normal specialty tools, like a 36mm socket, (what's the pinions nuts, 29mm I think?), brake line flare, etc.
--recovery box - I also keep my welding kit inside this box (welding gloves, goggles, wire brush, 5 different kinds of weld sticks, and electrode clamp/cables to connect batteries together. normally 1/8 electrodes are good for 2 batteries 3/16 need 3 batts
--spare parts - ok this is one of the most important, and can only be built by experience with your jeep and it's stupid personality. for example, mine loves to burn front wheel bearings, hubs, and alternator brushes. Other stuff I carry, all u-joints, wheel bearings front and rear, front hubs (if you're running full width old truck axles like me), alternator, wheel studs, spare belt, spare alternator, vacuum line sections and splices, water pump, fuel pump, TPS, thermostat, etc.
--Dual batteries - yeah, best thing ever, lets say you get drunk and forget you headlights are on, oh wait, you are now a rotting corpse in the desert. unless you have dual batteries, you just switch over, start up, and re-charge the other one
--Air compressor - I'm running a converted AC pump. not just for refilling my 37" tires from 4 psi (yeah I have beadlocks) to 25 psi, but also for my air lockers, and also for running air tools. like once I didn't have the right size allen key to take off my hub to pull out a trashed bearing, so I used the air system to a die grinder to grind down a larger Allen key to get what I needed

This is just a sampling, if you go out alone and get stuck and die, do not blame me, this is just what I found useful!
 
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SC Rednek

NAXJA Member
NAXJA Member
Oh, and just a melted wire, why couldn't you just cut and splice it around the melted portion?
 

waxer

New member
Need air, I made a spark plug air connector, 20 feet of air hose and a tire filler nozzle. Just unhook that injector. I usually use number 2, it is easy to get at.
Very interesting idea. How well does it perform compared to onboard air systems? Does oil from the cylinder get pushed into the air hose? Got any pics of your setup?
 

8Mud

New member
Very interesting idea. How well does it perform compared to onboard air systems? Does oil from the cylinder get pushed into the air hose? Got any pics of your setup?

Really not worth breaking the camera out to take a picture of. Though my spark plug adapter is kind of interesting, broke the outside ceramic and center out of a spark plug, cut off an old tire valve stem, removed the insides of the valve, silver soldered the tire valve tube into the plug base, cleaned the threads up a little, replaced the inside valve, good to go.

Quick disconnect tire valve ends for the compressor hose and the hose, is by the compressors at Lowes or Home Depot.

The hose is almost clear, no great amount of trash in it, so I guess it pumps reasonably clean. I wouldn't do it without disabling the injector(s) or the fuel pump !!!!! or you are building a bomb !!!!! Fuel and air under pressure goes boom, static electricity could set it off.

I had a cigarette lighter plug in Coleman air compressor I used maybe twice in twenty years, it was never very good anyway, very low volume, it died of old age. Works better than my old Coleman did, packs into a flat bundle inside a plastic bag. Not something likely to be used often, though I have used it numerous times to dry out the inside of the distributor and to blow out other stuff. Even used the hose with my spare once, because I couldn't drive close enough to a buddy stuck with wet ignition in a mud pit.

Most compression gauge adapters can be made into the same setup with a couple of fittings, many have a tire type valve already. A leak down tester/adapter could also be used. I'm cheap and make my own stuff when practical.

!!!!Remember disable the fuel someway or you are building a bomb!!!!
 

waxer

New member
Really not worth breaking the camera out to take a picture of. Though my spark plug adapter is kind of interesting, broke the outside ceramic and center out of a spark plug, cut off an old tire valve stem, removed the insides of the valve, silver soldered the tire valve tube into the plug base, cleaned the threads up a little, replaced the inside valve, good to go.

Quick disconnect tire valve ends for the compressor hose and the hose, is by the compressors at Lowes or Home Depot.

The hose is almost clear, no great amount of trash in it, so I guess it pumps reasonably clean. I wouldn't do it without disabling the injector(s) or the fuel pump !!!!! or you are building a bomb !!!!! Fuel and air under pressure goes boom, static electricity could set it off.

I had a cigarette lighter plug in Coleman air compressor I used maybe twice in twenty years, it was never very good anyway, very low volume, it died of old age. Works better than my old Coleman did, packs into a flat bundle inside a plastic bag. Not something likely to be used often, though I have used it numerous times to dry out the inside of the distributor and to blow out other stuff. Even used the hose with my spare once, because I couldn't drive close enough to a buddy stuck with wet ignition in a mud pit.

Most compression gauge adapters can be made into the same setup with a couple of fittings, many have a tire type valve already. A leak down tester/adapter could also be used. I'm cheap and make my own stuff when practical.

!!!!Remember disable the fuel someway or you are building a bomb!!!!
Understood on the disabling the fuel pump/injector. So you're basically just cranking the motor and using the cylinder compression to get some air for a short duration?
 

PhotographerMike

New member
I had an oil pressure sender blow its' top, went through 6 quarts in 10 miles.
Fortunately I wasn't out and about. Probably "fixable" with the right size bolt to plug the hole.
Mike
 

cherokeefan_1

New member
I've had a distributor leave me once. Actually had two fail but caught the second one before it went south. Bearings failed in it.
 

montanaman

New member
silver soldered the tire valve tube into the plug base, cleaned the threads up a little, replaced the inside valve, good to go.
So it sounds like you are using the tire valve as a check valve ... is that right? The inside valve points down toward the cylinder?
 
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