Spring clamps\worm clamps

88 Wagonman

New member
I recently ordered new radiator hoses and clamps from an online OE parts source. All the parts were the same as original except for the hose clamp where is attaches to the top radiator inlet. Instead of being a spring clamp it supersceded to a worm drive clamp. Anyone know why? I prefer the spring clamps over the worm clamps because: 1) they expand and contract along with the hose and whatever the hose is attached to. 2) they don't require that you tighten them periodically. 3) they don't destroy the hose like the worm clamps do. If I can't buy the correct clamp from Chrysler anymore, where can I get the old clamp? Maybe too many mechanics complained about the clamp being a PITA to remove and install in that location?
 

winterbeater

New member
I agree with you 100%. I always thought the worm drive clamps were more heavy duty before I worked in powertrain cooling systems. They don't use them on new vehicles because they always need to be retightened (warranty costs), take more time to install, and cost more due to complex manufacture and design. I am VERY surprised that an OE hose came with the worm clamp. The top radiator inlet is pretty easy to get to at least for retightening. Or you could reuse your old clamp. Stop in at your local auto parts store, but they probably only carry worm drive because "everyone" thinks they are the best. I wonder if Chrysler had any issues with the spring type popping off?
 

88 Wagonman

New member
Or you could reuse your old clamp. Stop in at your local auto parts store, but they probably only carry worm drive because "everyone" thinks they are the best. I wonder if Chrysler had any issues with the spring type popping off?
I've only had this XJ for a few months now and the PO replaced all the clamps with the worm clamps so I can't reuse the old one.

I never thought about them popping off, could be why they changed them I guess.
 

5-90

New member
Really? I can't stand the things - I find the worm drive clamps easier to work with.

- Properly tightened, I've never needed to retighten them at intervals.
- Expansion and contraction doesn't seem to be a problem (at least, not in the thirty years or so I've dealt with them.)
- Any spring is going to gradually lose its elasticity. If it's not intended to be springy, that's a non-issue. Heat can accelerate that process (although it's only 200-250*F for the spring clamps, and therefore not much of a problem.)
- If they're put on "wrong" (the ears are in a goofy place,) they're a royal pain to remove again. It's easier to deal with a worm drive clamp that has gone awry. And I've had them "jump" out of the pliers a couple of times and misalign themselves...
- And, the worm drive clamps tend to be CRES, while the spring clamps are coated spring steel (which can - and do - rust.) A worm drive clamp is something I've found easier to deal with in the field using minimal tools.

Might I ask why you find them better? I'm curious...
 

dunbad

New member
spring clamps for me everytime. Overtightening is my main issue. You put a spring clamp on and you know it will fit like a german virgin, which is shnizen tight! I stopped using screw type when i cracked the plastic neck on my old xj from the overflow hose. Ive seen real old spring types ane id prefer an old spring type to a brand new jubilee clip.
 

KaiserMan

New member
I stopped using screw type when i cracked the plastic neck on my old xj from the overflow hose.
So you stopped using them because you cranked one down way to tight?

I've always used worm clamps. Much better and you can reuse them dozens of times.

Don't they recommend replacing spring clamps every time they are removed?
 

88 Wagonman

New member
I am not worried about them losing their tension. If you look at a brand new one they are much smaller than what they are meant to fit, so there is a lot of tension there. Why do I prefer them? I have never had one go bad, I have never had one destroy a hose, and with the right tools they are not very difficult to deal with. I have seen many hoses overtightened with the worm clamps and when you remove them and reinstall one they do even more damage. I guess this is going to be one of those topics that spark a lot of debate and everyone is going to have their own opinion. For now, I am going to use the three spring clamps that I ordered and I just got one from the JY to replace the worm clamp.
 

nick86

New member
Speaking as a paid profressional mechanic, I replace every spring clamp I take off & replace them with a worm clamp, at no charge to the customer. And if you have NEVER had a spring clamp NOT reseal a hose, than you haven't turned enough wrenches yet.
 

winterbeater

New member
I know that EVERYONE thinks worm clamps are the best. You can't hardly get spring clamps at an auto parts store. Almost every time I've used them, I have to retighten them after the hose ages a little. When I was working in OEM powertrain cooling, I researched it some and the spring clamps were more reliable (without later adjustment after initial seating). Don't get me wrong. On my water well, or air compressor fittings, I use two worm clamps, rotated so that the weak spots are 180 degrees offset and tighten them just short of being stripped. But for coolant hoses that heat up and cool down, the spring clamps provide a flexibility that the worm clamps don't. The plastics in the radiator tank expand and contract considerably. If the clamp doesn't, what are you left with? A loose clamp after it cools. The spring clamp moves with the product and maintains a more constant tension. And sorry to contradict you bob, but you must have turned enough wrenches to see worm clamps leak until they are retightened (at least sometimes).
 

stewie

New member
I know that EVERYONE thinks worm clamps are the best. You can't hardly get spring clamps at an auto parts store. Almost every time I've used them, I have to retighten them after the hose ages a little. When I was working in OEM powertrain cooling, I researched it some and the spring clamps were more reliable (without later adjustment after initial seating). Don't get me wrong. On my water well, or air compressor fittings, I use two worm clamps, rotated so that the weak spots are 180 degrees offset and tighten them just short of being stripped. But for coolant hoses that heat up and cool down, the spring clamps provide a flexibility that the worm clamps don't. The plastics in the radiator tank expand and contract considerably. If the clamp doesn't, what are you left with? A loose clamp after it cools. The spring clamp moves with the product and maintains a more constant tension. And sorry to contradict you bob, but you must have turned enough wrenches to see worm clamps leak until they are retightened (at least sometimes).
:bs:winter, the more you talk the more we understand that you know very little. many of your posts contain nothing but bs info. how about you think about whether or not the info you have is correct or not before you jack your jaw or let your fingers dance on the keyboard.:dunce:

and where did you "work in OEM powertrain cooling?" evidently it wasnt very long. if you had, you would have come to realize that the spring style hose clamps do work themselves loose surprisingly easy. i have even seen one that was still on there from the factory on an original hose and it was so loose that it could be rotated around the hose by hand with minimal resistance. i have yet to see a properly secured worm drive style hose clamp do that. sure they can be installed to loose, but so can just about anything else- operator error. so following your ideology there, then we should replace all the bolts and nuts in our rig with grooved studs and those annoying lock-washer clips right? cause they dont come loose do they?:gee:

oh, and if someone is worried about cutting their hose with a hose clamp, then they should invest in a good torque wrench. plumbers use a nice "T" handled torque wrench when working with no hub cast iron pipe. the pipe and fittings are joined together via a no hub band (a rubber gasket that covers both ends of the joint down on to the pipe and fitting and is compressed via multiple stainless steel worm drive hose clamps on top of a thin piece of corrugated stainless sheet). a plumbers torque wrench is used to make sure that there is proper torque on the bands. too little and the pipe joint will leak. too much and it distorts the rubber gasket and causes leaks. same concept can be applied to rubber hoses and hose clamps. someone could also use a fuel line hose clamp on their rig as the edges of the band are designed not to cause damage to the hose. im not sure in what sizes they are available for.
 

5-90

New member
someone could also use a fuel line hose clamp on their rig as the edges of the band are designed not to cause damage to the hose. im not sure in what sizes they are available for.
I know what you're talking about, stewie. Fuel line clamps (for fuel line) are usually available up to about 1-1/4", but you can find much larger sizes at fluid power outlets (I've seen them up to 4" ID there, and rated for something like 300psig.)

Benefits of a chequered past, no?
 

88 Wagonman

New member
5-90 and Stewie, I can see which type of clamp you like better, but any opinion on why they would change 1 out of 4 clamps to a worm drive?
 

5-90

New member
5-90 and Stewie, I can see which type of clamp you like better, but any opinion on why they would change 1 out of 4 clamps to a worm drive?
That's an easy one - the one spring clamp that got replaced is the one that got away. Anything spring-loaded has the chance to go froggy on you - ask anyone who's worked on Rochester carburettor linkages (I still have a boxful of them from when I'd pocket a few on boneyard crawls. They were known as "Dammits!" around the shop...)
 

88 Wagonman

New member
That's an easy one - the one spring clamp that got replaced is the one that got away. Anything spring-loaded has the chance to go froggy on you - ask anyone who's worked on Rochester carburettor linkages (I still have a boxful of them from when I'd pocket a few on boneyard crawls. They were known as "Dammits!" around the shop...)
No, what I mean is, I just ordered all 4 clamps from Chrysler and 3 of them were the original spring type and one of them was supersceded to a worm type. Why would they do one and not all four?
 

5-90

New member
No, what I mean is, I just ordered all 4 clamps from Chrysler and 3 of them were the original spring type and one of them was supersceded to a worm type. Why would they do one and not all four?
Let me answer your question with a question - did you get instructions on where to put the odd clamp, or no?
 

88 Wagonman

New member
No instructions, just the parts. Being that it is smaller than all the rest, and too small to fit any other hose, it has to go on the top radiator hose at the radiator inlet. I also double checked the part numbers and locations. Two of the clamps are the same and two are unique in their size and locations.
 

5-90

New member
No instructions, just the parts. Being that it is smaller than all the rest, and too small to fit any other hose, it has to go on the top radiator hose at the radiator inlet. I also double checked the part numbers and locations. Two of the clamps are the same and two are unique in their size and locations.
Parts bin was empty and they had to grab one from the next? Best I can do...
 

Ogrebonz

New member
I used to work in a marina as a rigger and parts manager. Never once saw a new or used boat with a spring clamp. I think the Coast Guard had something against them. (actually I know they do, it's a safety regulation) Also, I believe aircraft use worm clamps and band clamps with locknuts. The wide surface of the worm clamp seems like a better idea to me, just pay attention to how tight you're getting it. If you need a torque wrench for a hose clamp then I'm betting your oil filters only come off after you crush them, am I right?. And yes I've been turning wrenches for awhile.
 

5-90

New member
I used to work in a marina as a rigger and parts manager. Never once saw a new or used boat with a spring clamp. I think the Coast Guard had something against them. (actually I know they do, it's a safety regulation) Also, I believe aircraft use worm clamps and band clamps with locknuts. The wide surface of the worm clamp seems like a better idea to me, just pay attention to how tight you're getting it. If you need a torque wrench for a hose clamp then I'm betting your oil filters only come off after you crush them, am I right?. And yes I've been turning wrenches for awhile.
Not so - there are critical applications for worm drive clamps (fluid power comes to mind, again.) I probably still have the torque screwdrivers that I used when I was doing fluid power for a living (both set-to-torque and torque-limiting.)

It's less critical with a cooling system, since you're dealing with <20psig. Fluid power hose clamps can be good for =<300psig, so it's a shade more important (industrial plumbing apps can see ~75-100psig - water mains pressure - so it's a bit more important there as well...)
 

Ogrebonz

New member
My bad, I should have clarified that I meant in automotive type applications. Inboard and I/O marine engines are automotived based.
More to my point, if you're wrecking hoses with worm clamps then you're getting carried away with the screwdriver (or nutdriver, less chance of slipping off).
When I used to winterize boats I could tell every time which ones my brother-in-law had done the year before because the clamps were half stripped. The same guy used to all but roll his car over yanking on the oil filter wrench because...yeah, that's right, her over-tightened that too.
The fun part is that he's an overzelous neat freak and would just about go into a seizure when that filter split open and drained oil all over the engine, suspension, garage floor, him :) ahh, good times.....
 
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